7 Best Substitutes for Prosciutto You Should Try

Prosciutto is a delicious Italian ham that can be used in a variety of dishes.

However, if you’re looking for a substitute for prosciutto, don’t worry – we’ve got you covered!

In this article, we’ll list 10 substitutes for prosciutto that will give you the same great taste without having to go to the store.

So whether you’re looking for a last-minute substitution or just want to know about some different options, read on for our top picks!

Substitutes for Prosciutto

  1. Mushrooms
  2. Chickpeas And Nuts
  3. Cheese
  4. Culatello
  5. Guanciale
  6. Capicola
  7. Salami

Mushrooms

While most people think of mushrooms as simply a side dish, they can be used in a variety of ways.

For instance, mushrooms make an excellent substitute for prosciutto in recipes.

Mushrooms have a similar texture to prosciutto, and they can help to add flavor and depth to a dish.

In addition, mushrooms are a healthy alternative to prosciutto, as they are low in fat and calories.

When using mushrooms as a substitute for prosciutto, it is important to choose the type of mushroom that will best complement the dish.

For example, portobello mushrooms work well in Italian-inspired dishes, while shiitake mushrooms are a good choice for Asian-style recipes.

Chickpeas And Nuts

Chickpeas and nuts are two of the most common substitutes for prosciutto used in recipes.

Both of these ingredients provide a similar texture and flavor as prosciutto, making them ideal substitutes in many recipes.

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Chickpeas are a good choice for those looking for a more savory flavor, while nuts provide a more delicate flavor.

Both of these substitutes can be used in a variety of recipes, from salads to pasta dishes.

When choosing between these two substitutes, it is important to consider the other flavors in the dish and how they will interact with the flavors of chickpeas or nuts.

In general, both of these substitutes are suitable for most recipes that call for prosciutto. However, they may alter the flavor of the dish slightly.

Cheese

Cheese is a common substitute for prosciutto. While it doesn’t have the same salty flavor, it can still provide a bit of umami to a dish. It’s also a good source of protein and calcium.

Additionally, cheese is lower in fat and calories than prosciutto, making it a healthier option.

Recipes that call for prosciutto can usually be made with any type of cheese, though something like mozzarella or cheddar will work best.

When substituting cheese for prosciutto, it’s important to keep in mind that the dish may be slightly less salty.

As a result, you may need to add a bit more salt to the recipe.

Additionally, the cheese will not get crispy when cooked, so if you’re looking for that crunchy texture, you’ll need to find another substitute.

Culatello

Culatello is a type of dry-cured ham that originates from the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy.

It is made from the hindquarter of the pig, and the meat is seasoned with salt, black pepper, and garlic before being air-dried for several months.

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Culatello has a deep ruby color and a rich, salty flavor.

While it is often eaten on its own as an antipasto, it can also be used as a substitute for prosciutto in recipes.

When substituting culatello for prosciutto, it is important to keep in mind that culatello is more intensely flavored meat.

As a result, it should be used sparingly in dishes where it is the main ingredient.

For instance, culatello would make an excellent addition to a pasta dish or risotto, but it would be too overpowering if used as the sole protein in the main course.

In terms of texture, culatello is slightly drier and tougher than prosciutto, so it may need to be cooked slightly longer.

Guanciale

Guanciale is a type of Italian bacon that is made from pork cheek or jowl.

It has a deep, rich flavor and a firm texture that makes it ideal for slicing and using in a variety of dishes.

While it is most commonly used in pasta sauces, it can also be used as a substitute for prosciutto in several different recipes.

One of the benefits of using guanciale as a substitute for prosciutto is that it has a lower fat content.

This makes it a healthier option for those who are watching their fat intake. In addition, the deep flavor of guanciale can add a new dimension to recipes that call for prosciutto.

When choosing a recipe to use guanciale as a substitute, be sure to select one that will allow the flavor of the guanciale to shine through.

Dishes that are heavy on other ingredients may overwhelm the delicate flavor of the guanciale.

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Finally, while there are many substitutes for prosciutto, guanciale is one of the few that can truly stand-in for the real thing.

Capicola

There are many cases where capicola can be used as a substitute for prosciutto.

For example, if you are looking for a less expensive option, or if you are trying to find cured meat that is lower in sodium, capicola is a great choice.

Capicola is also a good option for those who are looking for a more robust flavor, as it is slightly more intense than prosciutto.

Additionally, it can be used in any recipe that calls for prosciutto, including antipasto platters, pizzas, and pasta dishes.

When substituting capicola for prosciutto, it is important to keep in mind that the flavors will be slightly different.

Capicola is saltier and more intensely flavored than prosciutto, so it may not be suitable for every dish.

Salami

Salami is a cured sausage made from pork (just like Prosciutto), and it can be easily found in most supermarkets.

It’s also relatively inexpensive, making it a great option for budget-minded cooks.

Moreover, salami comes in a variety of different flavors, so you can easily find one that suits your taste.

For instance, if you want a more intense flavor, you can try a spicy salami.

Or, if you prefer a milder flavor, opt for a sweet or fennel-infused salami. While the flavor of salami will be different from prosciutto, it can be used as a substitute in many recipes.

For example, if you are making a pizza or pasta dish, simply swap out the prosciutto for salami.

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You may also want to try using salami in place of prosciutto on an antipasto platter.

Commonly Asked Questions When Choosing Substitutes for Prosciutto

  • What is the difference between prosciutto and culatello?

Culatello is a type of Italian cured meat that is made from pork loin. It has a delicate flavor and a softer texture than prosciutto.

Additionally, it is less salty than prosciutto and has a higher fat content.

  • What is the difference between prosciutto and guanciale?

Guanciale is a type of Italian bacon that is made from pork cheek or jowl. It has a deep, rich flavor and a firm texture that makes it ideal for slicing and using in a variety of dishes.

Additionally, it has lower fat content than prosciutto.

  • What is the difference between prosciutto and capicola?

Capicola is a type of Italian cured meat that is made from pork shoulder. It has a slightly more intense flavor than prosciutto and is saltier.

Additionally, it can be found in most supermarkets and is relatively inexpensive.

Conclusion

There are many substitutes for prosciutto, each with its unique flavor and texture.

When choosing a substitute, it is important to keep in mind the flavors of the dish you are making.

Now get cooking and enjoy the flavor of prosciutto, even without the real thing!