8 Substitutes for Curing Salt – Top Options to Try

I was in the middle of curing a batch of bacon when I realized that I had run out of curing salt. I panicked for a second, but then I remembered that I had a few substitutes that I could try.

I first tried using table salt, but the bacon turned out very salty. Next, I tried using sea salt, but the flavor was off. Finally, I tried pink Himalayan salt and it worked like a charm!

So to save you the hassle of experimenting, here are the best substitutes for curing salt.

Substitutes for Curing Salt:

  1. Non-iodized sea salt
  2. Saltpeter
  3. Himalayan salt
  4. Celery powder
  5. Vinegar
  6. Raw sugar
  7. Kosher salt
  8. Homemade curing salt

Non-iodized sea salt

Non-iodized sea salt is a great substitute for curing salt. It’s easy to find, has a nice salty texture, and helps preserve food for longer.

The benefits of using the substitute are that it doesn’t add any iodine to the food, which can be unhealthy in large quantities, and that it doesn’t change the flavor of the food as much as iodized salt does.

Non-iodized sea salt is also a good choice for people who are on a low-sodium diet. Plus, when substituting non-iodized sea salt for curing salt, you don’t need to make any changes to the recipe!

Saltpeter

Saltpeter, also known as potassium nitrate, is a white crystalline substance that is nitrogen-rich and therefore acts as a preservative.

It is often used in curing salt because it helps to draw out moisture, which can prevent food spoilage.

Saltpeter can be used as a substitute for curing salt in many cases. For example, if you are making bacon at home, you can use the same amount of saltpeter in place of the curing salt.

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The two ingredients have similar properties, so using saltpeter as a substitute will not significantly change the taste or texture of the bacon.

Himalayan salt

Himalayan salt, also known as pink salt, is a type of rock salt that is mined in the Himalayan Mountains. It gets its pretty pinkish shade from the high mineral content, which includes iron, magnesium, calcium, and potassium.

Himalayan salt can be used as a substitute for curing salt, particularly if you want to prolong the food’s shelf life.

When using Himalayan pink salt as a substitute for curing salt, you can use the same amount as you would for regular salt. This will ensure that your food is properly seasoned.

But the meat might have a more intense flavor with a slightly salty taste. This is due to the mineral content in the Himalayan salt.

Celery powder

Celery powder is a fine, organic powder made from dried and ground celery. It is a healthier alternative to conventional curing salt, as it is nitrate-rich and contains no preservatives.

Celery powder can be used as a substitute for curing salt in many recipes, such as sausages, ham, bacon, and other cured meats. When used as a substitute, celery powder imparts a milder flavor than regular curing salt.

However, it still provides the beneficial effects of preventing bacterial growth and extending the shelf life of meat.

Vinegar

Vinegar is a great substitute for curing salt because it can be used to cure fish and it can also tenderize meat. It also helps to enhance the flavor of food.

The method of curing meats with vinegar is slightly different. Instead of sprinkling it on top like curing salt, you have to simply soak the food in vinegar for a period of time.

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Vinegar is also a good source of acetic acid, which can help to kill harmful bacteria. And it is a natural preservative, which means that it can help to keep food fresh for longer periods of time.

Raw sugar

Raw sugar, also known as turbinado sugar, is a natural agent that can be used to cure meats. It particularly helps to enhance the flavor of pork belly bacon.

Raw sugar is a good substitute for curing salt because it has a similar effect on the meat. It is made from sugarcane juice that has been partially refined and has large crystals.

The sugar crystals help to keep the curing mixture on the surface of the meat, which allows for better flavor absorption.

To use raw sugar as a curing salt substitute, you will need to use roughly twice the amount of sugar as you would curing salt. It helps to tenderize the meat and also gives it a sweet flavor.

Kosher salt

Kosher salt is a great substitute for curing salt because it is non-iodized and does not add any unwanted flavor to the meat.

Because Kosher salt is also less dense than curing salt, you will need to use slightly more of it in order to achieve the same effect.

Kosher salt helps to soften the meat and prevent it from drying out during cooking. It also helps to keep the meat juicy and full of flavor.

In addition, Kosher salt can be used for meat brining, which helps to lock in moisture and ensure that the meat remains tender and juicy.

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Homemade curing salt

Homemade curing salt is a great substitute for store-bought curing salt. To make it, mix 2 pounds kosher salt, 2 1/2 cups of raw sugar, and 3 tablespoons celery powder in a large bowl. Store the mixture in an airtight container in a cool, dark place for up to 6 months.

This blend can be used in the same way as traditional curing salt, and it helps to prevent the growth of bacteria while imparting a subtle flavor to the meat.

When ready to use, sprinkle the homemade curing salt over the meat and rub it in well. You can use the same amount as store-bought curing salt.

FAQ

What is curing salt?

Curing salt, also known as pink curing salt or Prague powder #1, is a mixture of sodium chloride and sodium nitrite. It is used to cure meats and fish, and it helps to prevent the growth of bacteria while imparting a subtle flavor to the meat.

Curing salt is typically used in conjunction with other curing agents, such as sugar and spices.

How do I use curing salt?

Curing salt is typically used in a curing mixture, which is then rubbed onto the surface of the meat. The curing mixture helps to draw out moisture from the meat, which prevents bacteria from growing.

It also helps to tenderize the meat and give it a flavorful, slightly salty taste.

What are some substitutes for curing salt?

Some substitutes for curing salt include celery powder, vinegar, raw sugar, and Kosher salt.

Each of these substitutes has its own unique flavor profile that can be used to enhance the flavor of the meat.

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Celery powder is a great substitute for curing salt because it is rich in sodium nitrite, which helps to prevent the growth of bacteria.

Vinegar is also a good source of acetic acid, which can help to kill harmful bacteria. And it is a natural preservative, which means that it can help to keep food fresh for longer periods of time.

Conclusion

When it comes to curing salt substitutes, there are plenty of options to choose from. Each of these substitutes has its own unique flavor profile that can be used to enhance the flavor of the meat.

With a little bit of experimentation, you can find the perfect substitute for curing salt that fits your needs.